Developing leaders: it’s your job!

 

It’s not part of your job description. Nobody has told you that you need to spend time and effort developing others in your organization. You have too many other things to pay attention to, and besides, isn’t developing leaders the job of human resources?

If you are an organizational leader and this is how you think about developing others, you might want to rethink your stance. Put simply, it’s your job. It should be one of the most important things you do, and for the best leaders (meaning those leaders who understand the importance of people to their organization), it is a pleasure to assist and watch others grow and develop.

There are lots of reasons to spend time developing leaders in your organization. Some of the most important include:

Tapping potential: There is leadership potential in all of your employees that is lying fallow, just waiting to be set free by you. As you think about the upcoming Olympics, consider how many of those athletes had a coach or mentor who tapped into their unused potential to guide them to becoming world class. The ability to become the best at their sport was there all along; it just needed someone to help it along. Look for those who are eager to be more; willing to work hard to become world class leaders, and guide them to reach (or exceed) the potential within.

Performance: The best leaders know that their organizations can become so much more than they are currently; they see the future and they know that when everyone leads organizational performance increases and innovation, creativity, and output will grow. Developing leaders makes possibility become reality, and studies have shown that investments in developing leaders can impact the bottom line.

Talent attraction: It’s so much easier to recruit and hire when people actually want to work for your organization. Developing leaders attracts talent, period. When you become known as a leader who is willing to spend the time developing other leaders, high potential employees will beat a path to your door, because they’re thirsty for what you have to offer.

Culture of leadership: Imagine, just for a moment, what it would be like for your organization to have a culture of leadership: employees at all levels taking responsibility, accountable to the vision and mission, collaborating and leading to the future. Sounds like a dream, doesn’t it? It’s not an impossible dream. I’ve been privileged to know a few organizations with a culture of leadership, and in every instance there is a leader at the top who places emphasis on developing leaders.

Sustainability: I don’t mean to be too ominous – but if you get hit by a bus tomorrow – or more likely left the organization, who will step into your place? I can’t think of a better reason to develop leaders in your organization. You have an obligation to make sure that others are ready to take your spot.

Legacy: What better legacy to leave behind when you move on than the memory of yourself as a person who grew and stretched others? The managers I’ve worked with who believed in me enough to mentor, coach and stretch me to go beyond what I thought I was capable of are the ones I remember fondly, use as examples, and write about. They left a positive emotional legacy for the people they invested time and effort in helping them to become the best leaders they could.

Whether it’s part of your job description or not, developing others is something you need to spend time and effort doing. So coach and mentor them, give them stretch assignments and allow them to take risks and sometimes fail. Your leadership and your organization can reach great heights when you put the effort and time into developing leaders.

 

Mary Jo Asmus is an executive coach and a former corporate executive who has spent the past 12 years as president of Aspire Collaborative Services, an executive-coaching firm that manages large-scale corporate-coaching initiatives and coaches leaders to prepare them for bigger and better things.

This post was originally published in Smartblog on Leadership.

I am a former executive in a Fortune 100 company. I have owned and operated an executive coaching firm since 2003 called Aspire Collaborative Services LLC. We partner with great leaders to help them become even greater at developing, improving, and sustaining relationships with the people who are essential to their success. This blog is for leaders and those who help them to be more intentional about relationships at work. My top personal values include respect for others, kindness, compassion, collaboration and gratitude. I work very hard at practicing my values daily and when I don’t succeed, I practice some more. I am married with two wonderful daughters and two spoiled pugs.

2 comments on “Developing leaders: it’s your job!

  1. I agree with all the points and reasons. It is also important to never stop developing yourself as a leader. For the same reasons. Leaders can be defined by their appetite to grow and develop themselves and to never stand still. Some of the greatest leaders today take mentors and this is something I encourage and have personally benefitted from. The journey of a leader never ends. The power of a mentor can never be underestimated.

  2. Stuart, how true. In fact, I would say that the first thing a leader needs to do is develop themselves. It shows that they have room to grow. Having a mentor is one great way (and it usually doesn’t cost a dime!) to develop oneself.

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